Internet GDPR

  • Created By Thread starter Connie
  • ( Start date , 3 Replies)

  • Tags gdpr
Connie
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Connie

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#1
Not fully understanding this, my inbox is full of emails about updating policies and opting in.

Will this mean the end of spam emails and texts etc?

I also assume companies will no longer be able to sell data to others?
 
David76
Staff member

David76

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#2
I've no issues with trying to tighten up the regulations. My issue is with the regulations that have been introduced being wishy washy, as clear as mud and utterly bonkers for small firms.
 
Major Tom
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Major Tom

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1,270
#3
Not fully understanding this, my inbox is full of emails about updating policies and opting in.

Will this mean the end of spam emails and texts etc?

I also assume companies will no longer be able to sell data to others?
Of course it won't.

The laws surrounding email and selling of data haven't really changed significantly from the existing Data Protection Laws.

Reputable companies will continue to behave the same and spammers will continue to flout the law.

The daft thing is that the new regulations seem to be getting used to send more spam out than ever from some of the more reputable companies under the guise of informing people about their updated privacy policies...with a bit extra on the end of the email trying to get you to buy some special deal.
 
Bandit
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Bandit

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#4
On the first day of GDPR enforcement, Facebook and Google have been hit with a raft of lawsuits accusing the companies of coercing users into sharing personal data. The lawsuits, which seek to fine Facebook 3.9 billion and Google 3.7 billion euro, were filed by Austrian privacy activist Max Schrems, a longtime critic of the companies’ data collection practices.

GDPR requires clear consent and justification for any personal data collected from users, guidelines that have pushed companies across the internet to revise their privacy policies and collection practices. But there is still widespread uncertainty over how European regulators will treat the requirements, and many companies are still unprepared for enforcement.

Both Google and Facebook have rolled out new policies and products to comply with GDPR, but Schrems’ complaints argue those policies don’t go far enough. In particular, the complaint singles out the way companies obtain consent for the privacy policies, asking users to check a box in order to access services. It’s a widespread practice for online services, but the complaints argue that it forces users into an all-or-nothing choice, a violation of the GDPR’s provisions around particularized consent.

Shrems told the Financial Times that the existing consent systems were clearly non-compliant. “They totally know that it’s going to be a violation,” he said. “They don’t even try to hide it.”

The lawsuits are broken up into specific products, with one filed against Facebook and two others against its Instagram and WhatsApp subsidiaries. A fourth suit was filed against Google’s Android operating system.

Both companies have disputed the charges, arguing that existing measures were adequate to meet GDPR requirements. “We build privacy and security into our products from the very earliest stages,” Google said in a statement, “and are committed to complying with the EU GDPR.”

Facebook offered a similar defense, saying, “we have prepared for the past 18 months to ensure we meet the requirements of the GDPR.”
 

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